Learning and teaching with technology in higher ecucation


Technology is adapted to the tradition, not challenging the tradition.

I just read this review answering the following question; How can teaching with technology support student active learning in higher education? It is a particularly interesting question to me since many teachers in high schools in Norway, use universities and colleges as an “excuse” to carrying own a traditional approach to learning.

Just as in high school the increasingly diverse student population requires a new approach to learning at universities. Both secondary and higher education face major changes in the student groups. So where are the obstacles in changing to a more student-centered approach? Studies show that when introducing new technology staff tends to adapt new technology to traditional practice. This has been a concern of mine for a long time and I think we are seeing some of it in middle school in Norway too. When the computers first were introduced in high schools in Norway, most teachers were not aware of how to apply it in a way that enhanced the students’ learning. Using technology with old pedagogy, like lecturing when the students are hiding behind a computer, will not engage students. If they, on the other hand, had watched the lecture before they came to school/university, time could be much better spent, working in teams with the teacher as a coach. When describing collaborative learning it is vital to design the learning to support collaboration and encourage active students. Like in co-operative learning in high school, most students need to learn how to work this way. This can be done if you are meticulous when designing these tasks. The study also finds that there are barriers to how technology is used and implementing innovative teaching. We need to focus on pedagogy first, technology second. This is also something I find applies to lower grades as well.

I’m sharing what I found interesting in the article here:

Teaching in higher education appears to be trapped in prescriptive practices,  inspired by a behaviorist idea about learning where teaching is perceived as one-way «delivery of content».
· Technology is adapted to the tradition, not challenging the tradition.
· Researchers argue that, instead, learning should be student-active. This requires that teachers work collaboratively and know how to develop learning designs.:

A systematic mapping of the effects of ICT on learning outcome1 showed that it is how digital tools are implemented and used pedagogically that matter for students’ learning outcome, not the technology itself. The Status report on Norwegian higher education5 showed that higher education institutions are not fully exploiting the possibilities in digital technology. Norwegian students reported that they only to a small degree experienced pedagogical use of digital technology in their education. This problem is not exclusive to Norway. The EU Commission6 argues that member states should be supported in developing national frameworks and infrastructure for integrating new modes of learning and teaching across the higher education system.

An underlying assumption in the studies is that teaching can no longer be the sole responsibility of individual teachers. Having investigated the potential educational benefits of a combination of capture technologies (recorded lectures) and a variety of traditional classroom practices across digital and physical learning contexts, studies report inconsistent findings.

Blended and hybrid learning requires increased time commitment from teachers, and students are expected to develop skills in goal setting, monitoring, time management and self-evaluation, in addition to a range of selfregulation strategies.

The included studies show that emerging technologies, such as games, must be goal directed, competitive, and designed within a framework of choices and feedback to enable teachers and students to monitor learning progress. Playing and designing games can contribute to active, engaging, and authentic educational experiences. Introducing new technology does not, in itself, guarantee innovative practices in higher education institutions. Instead of taking the opportunity to introduce student active teaching methods, staff tends to adapt new technologies to traditional practice. The included studies show that emerging technologies, such as games, must be goal directed, competitive, and designed within a framework of choices and feedback to enable teachers and students to monitor learning progress. Playing and designing games can contribute to active, engaging, and authentic educational experiences. Introducing new technology does not, in itself, guarantee innovative practices in higher education institutions. Instead of taking the opportunity to introduce student active teaching methods, staff tends to adapt new technologies to traditional practice.

The included studies show that emerging technologies, such as games, must be goal directed, competitive, and designed within a framework of choices and feedback to enable teachers and students to monitor learning progress. Playing and designing games can contribute to active, engaging, and authentic educational experiences. Introducing new technology does not, in itself, guarantee innovative practices in higher education institutions. Instead of taking the opportunity to introduce student active teaching methods, staff tends to adapt new technologies to traditional practice.

: Collaborative learning, five studies are presented. There are indications in the research that when students work in groups, responsibility tends to be dispersed. This highlights the need for learning designs that support collaboration and activate each student. Students in higher education are expected to learn to argue.

5: Barriers to technology use and innovative teaching. The studies show that there are significant barriers to technology use in higher education institutions. Therefore, the conclusion in all five studies is the obvious need to ensure that the focus of staff development programs in higher education is on instructors’ perception of teaching first, and then on technology

Technology is a tool with the potential to transform teaching and learning, facilitate collaboration and communication across contexts, and support student active learning. However, this potential is not realized unless teachers and staff use technology in a pedagogically appropriate manner. Researchers suggest that teachers abandon a behaviouristic perspective on learning and adopt a socio-cultural, constructivist approach. This requires that institutions prioritize professional development. Source: LillejordS..pdf

 

– a systematic review written by SØLVI LILLEJORD, KRISTIN BØRTE, KATRINE NESJE AND ERIK RUUD

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