The @DavidGeurin Blog: 20 Ways to Be Future Driven in Your Classroom


Reflection is so important for continued learning and growth. I developed the list below as a tool for educators to reflect on practices that help prepare students for a rapidly changing, complex world. Some of these practices are new. Some are not. Some of them involve technology. Some do not.

Source: The @DavidGeurin Blog: 20 Ways to Be Future Driven in Your Classroom

Great advice from David Geurin here. I’m listing all his points here. How about trying. I’m thinking I usually am able to reach most of them during a school year. What do you think, try to reach 5? 10? 15?

20 Ways to be Future Driven in Your Classroom
1. I provide opportunities for project-based and inquiry-based learning.2. I give students choices about learning (time, place, path, or pace).

3. I am learning new things about technology and sharing my learning with students and teachers.

4. My students have opportunities to connect with real-world experts.

5. My classroom learning space provides flexibility for student-centered grouping and learning tasks.

6. My students regularly have opportunities to use digital tools to leverage their skills for learning tasks.

7. I utilize Genius Hour or 20 percent time to provide opportunities for students to pursue their passions and interests.

8. I model risk-taking, grit, and perseverance for students and regularly discuss the importance of these characteristics in class.

9. I build strong relationships by greeting students, calling them by name, and getting to know them as individuals.

10. My students assume considerable responsibility for class discussions. Conversations become student-led, instead of teacher-directed.

11. My students take on projects that make a difference in the community or in the world (service-learning).

12. My students have many opportunities to create work that will be visible to authentic audiences.

13. I am intentional about cultivating curiosity in my students by having them develop their own questions, by allowing exploration, or by creating mystery or intrigue.

14. I ask my students for feedback on my teaching and the relevance of my lessons.

15. Empathy is just as important as responsibility in my classroom.

16. I am focused more on what a child can do and not what he/she cannot do.

17. I think about how the future will be different for my students and strive to teach with that in mind.

18. My students have opportunities to experiment with different approaches, rather than just practicing a predetermined method.

19. Character is more important than compliance in my classroom.

20. My students have many chances to take initiative, not just follow directions.

 

Advertisements

One comment

  1. Another awesome article! Education is changing rapidly before our eyes. We either need to hop on board and take the lead, or we’ll be left behind. Kids deserve the very best we have to offer.

    On Sat, Jun 23, 2018 at 3:13 PM Connected Teaching and Learning wrote:

    > Ann S. Michaelsen posted: “Reflection is so important for continued > learning and growth. I developed the list below as a tool for educators to > reflect on practices that help prepare students for a rapidly changing, > complex world. Some of these practices are new. Some are not. Some ” >

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.