The digital classroom, transforming the way we learn

Teaching students to make their own talks on a subject they care about

TED Talks by brilliant kids and teens

Talks from scientists, musicians, innovators, activists — all under the age of 20. Watch these amazing wunderkinds.

Lesson plan

  1. Browse through all the videos below and try to decide which one you like the best. Write a text about why you liked it, any ideas you got, and what if anything inspired you.
  2. Choose a subject that you are passionate about and write a text about why this is of interest to you and how you could share this with others.
  3. Start preparing your own Ted talk and write a short outline of how your Ted talk will be.
  4. Start preparing your talk, remember to look at these videos again for ideas on how to do this.
  5. Record your Ted talk and share it with the class.

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Taylor Wilson believes nuclear fusion is a solution to our future energy needs, and that kids can change the world. And he knows something about both of those: When he was 14, he built a working fusion reactor in his parents’ garage. Now 17, he takes the TED stage at short notice to tell (the short version of) his story.

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Over 85 percent of all pancreatic cancers are diagnosed late, when someone has less than two percent chance of survival. How could this be? Jack Andraka talks about how he developed a promising early detection test for pancreatic cancer that’s super cheap, effective and non-invasive — all before his 16th birthday.

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Violinist Sirena Huang gives a technically brilliant and emotionally nuanced performance. In a charming interlude, the 11-year-old praises the timeless design of her instrument.

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Child prodigy Adora Svitak says the world needs “childish” thinking: bold ideas, wild creativity and especially optimism. Kids’ big dreams deserve high expectations, she says, starting with grownups’ willingness to learn from children as much as to teach.

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At age 14, in poverty and famine, a Malawian boy built a windmill to power his family’s home. Now at 22, William Kamkwamba, who speaks at TED, here, for the second time, shares in his own words the moving tale of invention that changed his life.

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What do science and play have in common? Neuroscientist Beau Lotto thinks all people (kids included) should participate in science and, through the process of discovery, change perceptions. He’s seconded by 12-year-old Amy O’Toole, who, along with 25 of her classmates, published the first peer-reviewed article by schoolchildren, about the Blackawton bees project. It starts: “Once upon a time … “

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In the Maasai community where Richard Turere lives with his family, cattle are all-important. But lion attacks were growing more frequent. In this short, inspiring talk, the young inventor shares the solar-powered solution he designed to safely scare the lions away.

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